Archive for the ‘Window Film Posts’ Category

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You may be familiar with this story, or at least the picture of this gentleman. It has been all over the news and various television shows. The New England Journal of Medicine has an article about the man pictured above. The left side of his face is severely sun damaged from driving a truck for 25 years and being exposed to the UV rays entering the vehicle. You can find the original article HERE.

This is great information that exposes the truth about the extreme exposure to UV that we are exposed to while driving our vehicles. Many of us would not even consider being outside for any amount of time without some sunscreen to protect our skin. However, we will think nothing of sitting for hours in a car without any form of protection from the sun’s harmful rays. There is an answer in the form of a UV filtering window film for your car’s windows. New technology films can offer significant protection and still appear as clear glass if a tinted look is not something you want. Also, many quality window films have been awarded the Seal of Recommendation from the Skin Cancer Foundation for providing a safe and effective protection against UV radiation. Call your local automotive window film provider to find out more information about which films they offer than have been awarded the Seal of Recommendation and what the cost would be to start protecting yourself from harmful UV rays while you are driving.

From The Skin Cancer Foundation

For most people, car safety means seatbelts and airbags. But there’s another important way to stay out of harm’s way on the road, and that’s by protecting your skin from the sun.

A recent study in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology revealed that nearly 53 percent of skin cancers in the US occur on the left, or drivers’ side of the body. If you’re one of the approximately 208 million licensed drivers in the US, take heed: “The increase in left-sided skin cancers may be from the UV (ultraviolet) exposure we get when driving a car,” said Susan T. Butler, MD, coauthor of the study.

Here’s how to protect your skin when you’re in a car:
Treat Your Vehicle to Window Film

The sun’s ultraviolet radiation is associated with most cases of skin cancer, which will affect one in five Americans over a lifetime. UV radiation reaches us in the form of shortwave UVB and long-wave UVA rays, but glass blocks only UVB effectively. Although car windshields are partially treated to filter out UVA, the side windows let in about 63 percent of the sun’s UVA radiation; rear windows are also unprotected, leaving back seat passengers exposed. There is, however, a solution. Transparent window film screens out almost 100 percent of UVB and UVA without reducing visibility, and is available in all 50 states. If you have window film installed, remember that it protects you only when the windows are closed.
Keep Sunscreen in the Car

A sunscreen should be on hand for quick reapplication during long drives (The Skin Cancer Foundation recommends reapplying every two hours). Look for one with an SPF of 15+ and some combination of the following UVA-blocking ingredients: avobenzone, ecamsule, oxybenzone, titanium dioxide, and zinc oxide.
Skip the Sunroof, Skip the Convertible

Drivers’ heads and necks receive the most UV exposure, so it’s no surprise that Butler’s team found over 82 percent of skin cancers on the patients’ heads or necks. A solid, closed roof is your best bet. If you have a sunroof or a convertible top, wear a hat, preferably a wide-brimmed one (3″ or greater all around). At the very least, be sure to apply sunscreen to exposed areas of the face, neck, and scalp.

The second most common area for skin cancers was the arm, so, in addition to applying sunscreen, avoid propping your elbow up on the open window while you drive-keep both arms inside the car, and your hands on the wheel. Long-sleeved shirts are also a great sun-protective option.

Keep a hat in the car, along with your sunscreen and UV-blocking sunglasses, and you’ll have a sun protection travel kit to see you safely to your destination.

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As many of you know, I recently changed jobs. The following headline and link tell the story of the last month of my life.

Patric Frankso has been appointed chief marketing officer for Interwest Distribution Co., effective today. Fransko recently resigned from Service Group Distribution and Zola Tools Distributing. You can check out the story in Window Film Magazine at the following link:

Fransko Joins Interwest as Chief Marketing Officer.

Friends, Colleagues and Business Associates,

This email is to inform you of my resignation as the COO of Service Group Distribution and Zola Distributing effective today. It has been my distinct pleasure to work with many of you over the years and I wanted to thank you for all of the support and business you have sent my way.

In the coming weeks, I will be taking some time to explore my options and to see what my next steps might be. I will be sure to let all of you know my plans once they are determined. You can reach me at the phone number or email below if you would like.

Until then, I wish all of you the very best and again THANK YOU!

Best Regards,

Patric J. Fransko

patricfransko@gmail.com

714-371-5984

IWFA Western Regional Conference

Friday, April 19 – Saturday, April 20, 2013

 Location: Sheraton Ontario, CA

The Members Action Committee of the IWFA is holding a two-day conference.

Cost: $29.95 for IWFA members and $79.95 non-member, with a chance to join the IWFA at a reduced rate during the conference only.

Agenda: Friday – IWFA Testing and Accreditation, followed by evening networking event.

Saturday– Hour-long seminars from 7:30 am – 5 pm, covering new CA building code, the financial aspect of running a dealership, marketing, the latest trends, and more. Lunch will be provided.

 Registration Is Now Open: (From the strong response already received, we anticipate a sell-out!)

To obtain conference room rates & reserve your place now contact: info@iwfa.com or 276.666.4932                                                             

This is a very interesting read. While the technology is still in the early stages, it is interesting to dream about how this might effect the window film industry over the course of the next decade or more. One thing is for sure, things are changing fast!

Enjoy the read, Patric

Article by Philippe Crowe

New Energy Technologies, Inc., a developer of see-through solar cells for generating electricity on glass, announced yesterday an improvement in its manufacturing technique that should lead to higher speed, lower costs and greater durability.

Teaming with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), New Energy Technologies Inc. has developed the use of low-cost materials and a special application technique that could help optimize the movement of electrons within the ultra-thin solar cells. This should increase the amount of electricity produced when New Energy’s see-through SolarWindow prototype is exposed to natural or artificial light.

Importantly, the improvement to the technology can be executed at ambient pressure and low temperatures, allowing researchers to avoid the use of materials that must otherwise be applied using high temperature vacuum deposition. Vacuum deposition is both expensive and time-consuming and, thus, not practical for high speed and large-scale applications. Today’s innovation promotes low processing temperatures, enabling high-speed roll-to-roll (R2R) and sheet-to-sheet (S2S) manufacturing. This large-area, R2R and S2S fabrication capability and improved durability of SolarWindow technology are crucial for production of market-ready electricity-generating coatings on see-through glass and plastic.

While this technology is mostly aimed at residential and commercial buildings, it is not far fetched to imagine this technology used on a car’s sunroof or side windows to help keep the batteries topped up.

Previously, New Energy, with assistance from University of South Florida and NREL, developed important improvements to New Energy’s SolarWindow technology, capable of generating electricity on see-through glass. These improvements include enhancements that address advancing durability, power performance, and cost-effective manufacturability – all important to the eventual commercial deployment of New Energy’s SolarWindow technology.

“Over the past few months, our researchers have unveiled a virtually invisible conductive wiring system, which collects and transports electricity on SolarWindow prototypes, and have fabricated a large area working module, which is more than 14-times larger than previous organic photovoltaic devices fabricated at NREL,” stated John A. Conklin, president and CEO of New Energy Technologies, Inc. “Earlier, we developed our first-ever working SolarWindow prototype using a faster, rapid scale-up process for applying solution-based coatings.

“Together, these achievements have moved us closer to our manufacturing, scale-up, durability, and power production goals – all important factors to advancing our SolarWindow technology towards commercial launch,” Conklin added.

To generate electricity on SolarWindow prototypes, researchers creatively layer and arrange unique, ultra-thin see-through solar cells onto glass. Each of these cells is arranged in a network and interconnected by way of a virtually invisible grid-like wiring system.

Within these ultra-thin solar cells, the light-induced movement of electrons generates electricity. When SolarWindow prototypes are exposed to light, the light’s energy prompts electron movement through specific physical and chemical mechanisms leading to power generation.

Dr. Scott R. Hammond, principal scientist at New Energy Technologies, Inc., believes the discovery announced today could also favorably improve durability and shelf-life of the Company’s future SolarWindow products.

“NREL scientists have previously published unrelated results that demonstrate dramatic improvements to the operational and shelf-life of unprotected (i.e., non-encapsulated) photovoltaic devices utilizing related materials when subjected to continuous illumination,” he said. “No doubt, this is a promising and significant advancement.”